More information about the coronavirus and restrictions related to it is available calling 1247 (from abroad +372 600 1247).

Vaccination plan and risk groups

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The vaccination will be postponed if the patient is severely ill with COVID-19.

Having had COVID-19 or seropositivity is not a contraindication to vaccination:

  • people who have had COVID-19 must be vaccinated with one dose one week to six months after recovery. People who have had the virus and have been vaccinated with one dose are considered to be vaccinated for the following six months.
  • People who get COVID-19 after receiving the first dose of the vaccine will not be administered the second dose and are considered vaccinated for the following six months.

Last updated: 16.03.2021 16:44

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It was decided that first priority in vaccinations is given to people who ensure that health and social care services could function in regular order, and risk groups:

  • health care workers and people working in health care facilities -- ca 30,000 people;
  • workers and residents of care facilities -- ca 25,000 people;
  • all people over 70 years of age and people with certain diagnoses -- ca 260,000 people.

After this, vaccinations will be provided for representatives of sectors most critical for the functioning of the society:

  • front line workers with a higher risk of infection;
  • providers of vital services (in the meaning of the Emergency Act).

Vaccinations are voluntary in Estonia. Every vaccination contributes to stopping the spread of the virus and returning to regular life, and allows to also protect those that cannnot get vaccinated for different reasons. The plan is to provide vaccinations to all the residents of Estonia who wish to get them at first chance, when a sufficient quantity of vaccines has been obtained

More information in the vaccination plan (https://www.sm.ee/sites/default/files/news-related-files/covid-19_vaktsineerimise_plaan_19.01.pdf)

Last updated: 12.03.2021 13:22

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It is possible to vaccinate children against the COVID-19 disease when a vaccine suitable for children is found.

More information about Pizeri and BioNTechi vaccine Comirnaty can be found on this information sheet: https://www.ravimiregister.ee/publichomepage.aspx?pv=PublicMedDetail&vid=982df82a-b18a-4218-84fb-093ad8386b69

Last updated: 27.12.2020 17:17

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The COVID-19 vaccines are procured by the state and are currently not attainable for a payment in Estonia. According to the decision of the Government of the Republic, the vaccinations will be free for all Estonian people, including the persons not covered by health insurance, until the end of 2021. If at some point the vaccines reach the private market, it would be possible to get vaccinated by paying for it but that is very unlikely to happen in the near future, considering the huge demand in the whole world.

Last updated: 17.03.2021 10:35

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Priority in vaccinations is given to risk groups, i.e. health care workers, workers of health care facilities, workers and residents of care facilities, older people (70+) and people with certain diagnoses.

After this, vaccinations will be provided for people providing vital services and front line workers with a higher risk of infection.

Upon new vaccines coming to the market and an increase in the delivery volumes, the number of people who can get vaccinated will also increase. Depending on the quantity of vaccines that reach Estonia, the goal is to achieve a state whereby getting a COVID-19 vaccine will be possible for all who want it by the second quarter of 2021.

The vaccination of children will begin when a vaccine suitable for children will become available.

Last updated: 27.12.2020 17:14

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At the beginning of the summer of 2020, the COVID-19 vaccination risk groups were defined and the general principles of COVID-19 vaccination were agreed in the Immunoprophylaxis Expert Committee advising the Ministry of Social Affairs. COVID-19 vaccination starts from health care professionals, employees of health care institutions, employees and residents of care institutions, people over the age of 70 and people with certain diagnoses. Vaccination will then be provided to frontline workers who have a higher risk of infection and providers of essential services. As soon as possible and in the presence of sufficient quantities of vaccine, vaccination will be made available to anyone who wishes to get vaccinated.

Vaccination is carried out on the basis of a list compiled by the Immunoprophylaxis Expert Committee of the Ministry of Social Affairs, which lists diseases and conditions which determine the higher risk populations. The list is presented in the vaccination plan of the Ministry of Social Affairs COVID-19: https://www.sm.ee/sites/default/files/news-related-files/covid-19_vaktsineerimise_plaan_19.01.pdf.

The list may change according to the vaccine summary of product characteristics, which sets out, inter alia, the indications and contra-indications. Also, if, in the opinion of the family doctor, there are people on their list who do not have the listed diseases or conditions, but who definitely need vaccination due to their health condition (eg a rare disease patient, etc.), the family doctor may vaccinate them as a priority. The role of the Estonian Health Insurance Fund is to extract from the Health Insurance Fund database (on the basis of medical bills and enrolment) a list of people with the corresponding characteristics in the list.

Last updated: 04.03.2021 18:00

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It is not possible to conduct vaccinations of elderly people at home with the vaccines currently in use, as the vaccines cannot be diluted, i.e. there are several doses in one vial. In order to be able to carry out mobile vaccinations, we must wait until a vaccine comes into use that can be transported more easily.

Last updated: 11.02.2021 09:30

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The contraindications to the vaccine are hypersensitivity to the active ingredient or the exipients of the vaccine.

  • Having been through COVID-19 or seropositivity are not contraindications for vaccinations, people who have had COVID-19 are vaccinated with 1 dose a week to six months after recovery and is considered vaccinated during the following six months. People who are infected with the COVID-19 disease after getting the first dose of the vaccine will not be administered a second dose anymore and is considered vaccinated during the following six months.
  • For people suffering from severe frailty syndrome, are in a very bad general condition or nearing the end of their life, even mild side effects (e.g. fever, nausea and vomiting) can have an adverse effect and fasten the arrival of death. If a person's life expectancy is shorter than the period of protection received with the vaccine, it is not feasible to vaccinate that person. The costs and benefits of vaccinating a person like that need to be evaluated very carefully and on an individual basis.
  • Close contacts may be vaccinated against COVID-19 after the quarantine period ends.
  • Pregnancy. There is limited experience with using the COVID-19 vaccines on pregnant women. The animal testing does not show any direct or indirect adverse effect on the pregnancy, the development of the embryo/foetus, birth or postnatal development. Administering the COVID-19 vaccine during pregnancy should be considered only in a situation where the possible benefits outweigh the possible risk to the mother and the foetus.
  • Breast feeding. It is not known whether the COVID-19 excrete into breast milk.
  • Fertility. Animal tests do not show direct or indirect adverse effects on reproductivity.
  • Hypersensitivity and anaphylaxis. People who experienced anaphylaxis after receiving the first dose of vaccine cannot be administered the second dose.
  • Reactions related to anxiety. In connection with vaccination, conditions related to anxiety might occur as a psychogenic reaction to a needle prick, including vasovagal reactions (fainting), hyperventilation and stress-related reactions. In order to avoid injuries due to fainting, it is important to ensure the necessary precautions (the vaccine must be administered in a sitting or prone position).
  • Concurrent disease. Vaccination must be postponed for all persons suffering from severe diseases with high fever or acute infection. It is not necessary to postpone vaccinations for people who have a mild infection and/or small fever.
  • Thrombocytopenia and coagulation disorders. Just like with other medicines that are administered with intramuscular injections, the COVID-19 vaccine must also be carefully administered to people receiving anticoagulation treatments or who have thrombocytopenia or other coagulation disorders (e.g. haemophilia), as bleeding or bruising might occur for them after an intramuscular injection.
  • People who have immune deficiency. The effectiveness, safety and immunogenicity of the vaccine have not been evaluated on people who have immune deficiency, including patients taking immune suppressants. The effectiveness of the COVID-19 vaccine might be smaller for people with immunodeficiency.
  • The ability to drive a car or handle heavy machinery. The COVID-19 vaccines have no or immaterial effect on the ability to drive a car or handle heavy machinery. Still, some of the side effects of the vaccine might have temporary effect on the ability to drive a car or handle heavy machinery.

Last updated: 09.03.2021 13:18

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People who have had the COVID-19 disease must be vaccinated with only one dose of teh vaccine within a week to six months after recovery, she is considered vaccinated during the following six months after receiving the vaccine. People who get the COVID-19 disease after receiving the first dose of the vaccine will not be administered the second dose and are considered vaccinated during the following six months.

Last updated: 09.03.2021 13:20

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Oncological diseases are not contraindicated for vaccination. Vaccination is particularly indicated for oncological patients as they have a very high risk of severe progression of the COVID-19 disease. All vaccines in use in Estonia are suitable for vaccinating oncological patients.

A person who has only a benign tumour does not belong in the risk group, for that there would need to be additional indicators like, for instance, age. The final decision is, of course, left to the family doctor who can take into account the person's current state of health, as it can change.

Last updated: 17.03.2021 17:08

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According to the recommendations of the Immunoprophylaxis Expert Committee, the AstraZeneca vaccine is used for immunizing people against the COVID-19 disease, regardless of comorbidities.

The data from the clinical studies of AstraZeneca showed that a longer interval than 6 weeks between the first and second dose should be preferred, as the efficacy of the vaccine is probably higher in that case. Starting from March 15, 2021, the recommendation of the state Immunoprophylaxis Expert Committee is to administer the second dose of the AstraZeneca vaccine 12 weeks after the initial dose. Upon agreement with the vaccinator or the vaccinating institution, it is possible to postpone the appointment for receiving the second dose from the initially arranged time to 12 weeks.

According to the data from the United Kingdom, the AstraZeneca vaccine is effective in preventing symptomatic COVID-19 disease and very effective in preventing severe forms of the disease even after the first dose. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/prioritising-the-first-covid-19-vaccine-dose-jcvi-statement/optimising-the-covid-19-vaccination-programme-for-maximum-short-term-impact

Last updated: 25.03.2021 11:07

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Vaccinating against the COVID-19 disease is probably the only sustainable solution in order to prevent the spread of the COVID-19 disease and return to the regular order of life. The contribution of each person is important for stopping the COVID-19 pandemic.

All the vaccines available in Estonia are very effective in preventing the severe form of the disease. Even if some of the vaccinated people do get sick, they go through the disease without ending up in a hospital.

The first results of vaccinating against the COVID-19 disease are apparent in Estonia as well -- the COVID-19 infection rate has gone down among health care workers. Experience from other countries confirms this -- severe progression of the disease and hospitalisations have gone down more than 80% in both the United Kingdom and Israel.

Vaccination is many times safer than suffering through the COVID-19 disease. The progression of the COVID-19 disease is unpredictable and differs from patient to patient -- because of comorbidities or high age, the disease can progress very severely. The possible longterm effects of suffering through the COVID-19 disease are currently also not known.

According to the data available by now and based on our previous knowledge, we can presume that the COVID-19 vaccines also protect relatively well from the transmission of the virus -- exactly how well and effectively will become clear over time as the studies are ongoing.

By getting vaccinated we are also protecting those who cannot protect themselves. There are people among us who cannot get vaccinated because of their health conditions.

Last updated: 10.03.2021 09:45

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If the foreign country allows vaccinating Estonian citizens there, the Estonian citizen working abroad has the possibility to get vaccinated there. Vaccination is also possible in Estonia, along with all others who wish for it, if the person is not in the group of essential services' providers and front line workers, or in a risk group.

Last updated: 16.03.2021 16:37

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The family doctors have been given guidelines that if it is not possible to vaccinate a person who is in the risk group, it might be feasible to vaccinate his caretaker.

Last updated: 16.03.2021 16:39

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The list of people in the risk group also includes those people who are currently not covered by health insurance. The goal is to vaccinate all persons who live in the country and from the vaccination perspective the health insurance makes no difference. The list of people in the risk group includes patients with certain diseases.

Last updated: 16.03.2021 16:39

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If the medical bill of a hypertonic person says that there is also heart or kidney damage, this person does belong to the risk group due to his disease. The total list of diagnoses that belong to the risk group is long. The Health Insurance Fund has used the medical bill database to put together the risk group, thus the decision of the family doctor who knows the patients in her list the best is also important. The diseases and conditions on the basis of which a person is considered to be at a high or a very high risk for the COVID-19 disease are listed in the Estonian COVID-19 vaccination plan.

Last updated: 16.03.2021 16:44

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More information about the coronavirus and restrictions related to it is available calling 1247 (from abroad +372 600 1247).