Grocery stores, shopping centres, restaurants

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Yes, you do. The restrictions apply based on the location, regardless of whether it is a private event or a regular restaurant visit.

The following restrictions apply in catering establishments even if the whole restaurant, cafe, bar or other catering establishment has been rented out to a single group:

  • limit to business hours: the person responsible for the activity has the obligation to ensure that visitors are not present in the sales or service area of the catering establishment between the hours of 23.00 and 06.00
  • COVID certificate: all visitors starting from the age of 12 years and three months have to present an identity document along with a valid COVID certificate proving that they are either vaccinated or recovered from the disease within the past six months, in order to participate. Those up to 17 years of age (included) can participate at the party with a negative result of a test done at a health care service provider as well. Both a PCR test done up to 72 hours earlier, an antigen-RTD test done up to 48 hours earlier are suitable, as well as a rapid test for which a certificate has been issued, done at a general pharmacy. Those under the age of 12 years and three months do not have to present any certificates or a negative test result.
  • wearing a mask: in public indoor spaces it is obligatory for all visitors 12 years old and older to wear a mask, except in activities where it is not possible (e.g. while eating and drinking)
  • dispersion and availability of disinfectants

The same approach is also obligatory if, for instance, a theatre or a cinema hall, a conference space is rented out for a private event.

If a catering establishment offers catering services in a private space or, for instance, brings the food to the offices of the company for its employees, it is not obligatory to check the certificates.

Last updated: 18.11.2021 13:22

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The following rules are in force for different age groups:

Going to entertainment establishments (e.g. cinema, theatre), eating on the premises of catering establishments, participating in different events and participating in other such checked activities:

Children under the age of 12 years and three months:

  • There are no restrictions: it is not necessary to present a COVID certificate or a negative test result

Age 12 years and three months to 17 (included):

  • Children and adolescents who have been vaccinated, equated to vaccinated (e.g. recovered from the disease and vaccinated) or have recovered from COVID.19 may participate in checked activities
  • It is also possible to participate with a negative test result: suitable proofs are an antigen-RTD test (up to 48 hours earlier)or PCR test (up to 72 hours earlier) done at a health care service provider before participating in the activity or the antigen-RTD test meant for self-testing done at a general pharmacy (up to 48 hours earlier).

Age 18+:

  • Adults have to be vaccinated, equated to vaccinated or recovered from COVID-19 in order to participate in checked activities
  • A negative test result is not sufficient to participate

Sports, training, youth work, hobby activities and informal education, refresher training, participating in sports competitions, and curricular visits to museums and exhibition facilities:

Children under the age of 12 years and three months:

  • There are no restrictions: it is not necessary to present a COVID certificate or a negative test result

Age 12 years and three months to 18 (included) and young people turning 19 during the 2021/2022 academic year:

  • There is no obligation to present a COVID certificate or a negative test result if they are studying in a general education or vocational school and they are not symptomatic.

For instance, a 17-year-old student can thus participate in dance practice and go to a class trip to a museum without restrictions but needs to present either a valid COVID certificate or a negative test result certificate that meets the requirements to visit a cinema or a restaurant. An 18- or 19-year-old student can participate in football practice without having to present a certificate or a negative test result but can only visit a cinema or a restaurant with a valid COVID certificate (a negative test result is not sufficient as a certificate).

Last updated: 15.11.2021 13:18

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The following rules apply in catering establishments:

A COVID certificate is obligatory (starting from the age of 12 years and three months)

In order to eat and drink on the premises of a restaurant, a cafe, a bar, and any other catering establishment, all persons who are older than 12 years old and three months have to present a valid COVID certificate proving that they have either:

  • completed the course of vaccinations within the past year (or completed the course of vaccinations and received an additional dose) or
  • recovered from COVID-19 and no more than six months (180 days) have passed since the moment the diagnosis was confirmed.

Young people in the age bracket of 12 years and three months to 17 years (included) can also dine on the premises with a certificate proving that they have done a test with a negative result at a health care service provider. Both a PCR test done up to 72 hours earlier and an antigen-RTD test done up to 48 hours earlier are suitable, as well as a rapid antigen test for which a certificate has been issued, done at a general pharmacy. For adults, a negative test result is not sufficient as a COVID certificate.

If vaccination is contraindicated to a person for health reasons, he can consume on the premises of a catering institution with a medical certificate confirming that fact.

Children younger than 12 years and three months do not have to present a COVID certificate or a negative test result.

The organisers have an obligation to check the validity of the certificates alongside an identity document. Certificates that have a QR code have to be checked digitally to verify their authenticity. Consuming on the premises is allowed only if checking COVID certificates is ensures -- this also applies if a catering establishment is rented out for, for instance, a birthday, company party or any other private event.

The access of unvaccinated people to events and activities is limited because their risk of getting infected is very high and if they are infected they spread the virus more than people who have immune protection; they also have a higher risk of suffering from the disease more severely and end up in a hospital.

Presenting a COVID certificate is not necessary for entering a catering establishment to pick up pre-ordered takeaway or provide delivery services but in that case a mask has to be worn. If a person refuses to wear a protective mask, the service provider or trader has the right to refuse to let them enter the sales or service area.

Protective mask

It is obligatory to wear mask in public indoor spaces, except during activities where this is not possible (for instance, while eating and drinking in a restaurant). Preference is given to a medical mask or a mask equated to that (e.g. a FFP1-3 mask or a N95 respirator), which stops the transmission of the coronavirus delta strain effectively. A scarf, a tube scarf, a collar, a visor, or any other object that has clearly not been meant to be worn as a protective mask does not count as a mask. If a person cannot get vaccinated for health reasons, he has to present a medical certificate to prove the contraindication.

Dispersion

Dispersion, the availability of disinfectants and following the disinfection requirements according to the instructions of the Health Board must be ensured at the indoor premises of catering establishments.

The doors close no later than at 23.00, until 06.00 it is only allowed to sell food for takeaway

A movement restriction between the hours of 23.00 and 06.00 applies in the indoor facilities of catering establishments (including restaurants, cafes, pubs, bars). At night-time it is only allowed to enter for buying food as takeaway or for providing delivery services. The person responsible for the activities must ensure that between the hours of 23.00 and 06.00 the only people present in the room for an extended period are the owner of the location of activities or his representative, the employees, and people connected to performing emergency tasks. The objective of the restriction is to allow companies to keep operating but avoid the gathering of people indoors during evening hours, and to reduce contacts between people who do not interact with each other daily.

Requirements to the employees

It is obligatory to behave in accordance with the results of the risk analysis of the employer. In employment relationships, the basis for going to work, the requirements regarding the use of personal protective equipment and other control measures of the spread of the virus (including the presenting of COVID certificates, testing, mask wearing etc.) is the working environment risk analysis conducted by the employer.

Last updated: 03.01.2022 17:04

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Protective mask

A protective mask must be worn in public indoor spaces, including the service areas of hair and beauty salons. A scarf, a tube scarf, a collar, a visor or any other object that is clearly not meant to be worn as a protective mask do not count as a mask. A mask must be worn by all persons over the age of 12 and the beauty service provider has the right to not allow people who are not wearing a mask to enter their sales or service area. If a person cannot wear a mask for health reasons, they have to prove their contraindication by presenting a certificate that has been issued by a health care service provider.

  • Wearing a mask is generally the responsibility of each individual themselves but in commercial establishments, service and other unchecked public indoor spaces the observation of the obligation to wear a mask must also be monitored by the service providers.

Dispersion

Dispersion, availability of disinfectants and following disinfection requirements in accordance with the instructions of the Health Board must be ensured in the public indoor spaces of hair and beauty salons.

COVID certificate

It is not obligatory to present the COVID certificate at hair and beauty salons, except when an organised event where checking the certificates is compulsory is taking place on the premises.

Requirements for the employees of hair and beauty salons

In employment relationships, the basis for going to work, the requirements regarding the use of personal protective equipment and other control measures of the spread of the virus (including the presenting of COVID certificates, testing, mask wearing etc.) is the working environment risk analysis conducted by the employer -- even if the hairdresser has their own company and she is a renter in the space. I.e. it is obligatory to behave in accordance with the risk analysis of the company.

Last updated: 16.11.2021 12:17

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In order to eat and drink on the premises, it is obligatory for all persons starting from the age of 12 years and three months to present a valid COVID certificate proving that they

  • have completed the course of vaccinations within the past year (or completed the course of vaccinations and received an additional dose) or
  • have recovered from COVID-19 and no more than six months (180 days) have passed since the moment the diagnosis was confirmed.

Young people in the age bracket of 12 years and three months to 17 years (included) may also dine on the premises with a certificate proving that they have done a test with a negative result at a health care service provider. Both a PCR test done up to 72 hours earlier and an antigen-RTD test done up to 48 hours earlier are suitable, as well as a rapid antigen test for which a certificate has been issued, done at a general pharmacy. For adults, a negative test result is not sufficient as a COVID certificate.

If a person cannot get vaccinated for health reasons, he can dine on the premises with a corresponding medical certificate. Those under the age of 12 years and three months do not have to present a COVID certificate or a negative test result. Consuming on the premises is allowed only if it is ensured that the certificates are checked along with an identity document.

It is not necessary to present the COVID certificate if the catering establishment is entered for picking up pre-ordered takeaway or providing delivery services (including ordering food to a hotel room), but in that case a protective mask must be worn. If a person refuses to wear a protective mask, the service provider or trader has the right to refuse to let them enter the sales or service area.

Dispersion, the availability of disinfectants and following the disinfection requirements according to the instructions of the Health Board must be ensured at the indoor premises of catering establishments.

Public indoor spaces of catering establishments (including restaurants, cafes, pubs, bars) are subject to a movement restriction between the hours of 23.00 and 06.00. During night-time it is only allowed to enter for buying food as takeaway or to provide delivery services.

Last updated: 16.11.2021 11:57

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It is not obligatory to ask for the COVID certificate in the catering establishments located at the security area of an international airport or in the waiting area of the passenger terminal of an international port (after the boarding check), and it is also not required to close the doors to visitors between the hours of 23.00 and 06.00.

The restaurants, bars and cafes located at the airport and the port do, however, have to ensure the dispersion of people within reason, the availability of disinfectants, and the following of disinfection rules in accordance with the instructions of the Health Board. Wearing a mask is obligatory in public indoor spaces, except in activities where it is not possible (e.g. while eating and drinking).

Last updated: 14.11.2021 20:33

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Yes, they must be checked because conference halls are subject to the obligation to present the certificates and this obligation also extends to private events taking place at the place of operations of the company.

Last updated: 30.08.2021 17:53

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It is not necessary to check COVID certificates for providing accommodation services, nor in the general areas of a hotel or a hostel.

It is, however, obligatory to check the infection risk status of persons at different events (e.g. seminars, conferences) and in public spaces that have been listed in the order, e.g. the restaurant of a hotel or a hostel (including while offering breakfast), a spa, a water park, a sports club or any other entertainment area.

Wearing a protective mask is obligatory in public indoor spaces.

Requirements for the employees

In employment relationships, the basis for going to work, the requirements regarding the use of personal protective equipment and other control measures of the spread of the virus (including the presenting of COVID certificates, testing, mask wearing etc.) is the working environment risk analysis conducted by the employer.

Last updated: 29.10.2021 21:00

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Yes, it is not obligatory to ask for a certificate if the place is an unrestricted area that is situated in a public space, e.g. on the streets of a neighbourhood.

Last updated: 30.08.2021 18:45

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A protective mask is obligatory

Wearing a protective mask is obligatory in public indoor spaces, (including stores, shopping centres, service facilities). A scarf, a tube scarf, a collar, a visor or any other object that is not clearly meant to be worn as a protective mask do not count as a mask. A preference is given to a medical mask or a mask equated to that (e.g. an FFP1-3 mask or a N95 respirator) which effectively stops the coronavirus from spreading. Wearing a mask is not obligatory for children under the age of 12. If a person cannot wear a mask for health reasons, he must present a medical certificate regarding the contraindication.

A trader has the right to refuse people who are not wearing a mask entry to their sales or service area.

Wearing a mask is generally the responsibility of each individual themselves but in commercial establishments, service and other unchecked public indoor spaces, the observance of the obligation to wear a mask must also be monitored by the service providers and traders

Dispersion

In public indoor spaces of stores there is an obligation to ensure dispersion, availability of disinfectants and following of the disinfection requirements in accordance with the requirements of the Health Board.

COVID certificates

It is not necessary to present a COVID certificate in a store, except in places that are located on the same territory where the check of infection risk status is required (e.g. cinemas, restaurants, sports clubs, children's play rooms etc. that are located in shopping centres).

Requirements for the employees

It is obligatory to behave in accordance with the results of the risk analysis of the employer. In employment relationships, the basis for going to work, the requirements regarding the use of personal protective equipment and other control measures of the spread of the virus (including the presenting of COVID certificates, testing, mask wearing etc.) is the working environment risk analysis conducted by the employer.

Stores and service facilities may remain open during night-time (23.00 to 06.00) as well

The movement restriction in public indoor spaces does not apply to the sales areas of stores and service areas of service providers.

Last updated: 20.12.2021 16:24

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No, they cannot, as they are simultaneously a store and a cafe. This means that it is compulsory to wear a mask while buying food as takeaway or providing delivery services and there is an obligation to check COVID certificates if catering takes place on the premises.

Last updated: 29.10.2021 21:02

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There is no obligation to check the certificate at the stores but the observance of other requirements imposed on commercial establishments (e.g. that the visitors of the store wear protective masks, dispersion, the availability of disinfectants, that the disinfection requirements are followed in accordance with the instructions of the Health Board) still has to be monitored, regardless of the number of clients.

Last updated: 22.10.2021 20:37

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Yes, the traders have to ensure that clients wear a mask and are dispersed on their territory, as well as the availability of disinfectants and the following of disinfecting requirements according to the instructions of the Health Board.

Wearing a mask is generally the responsibility of each individual themselves but in commercial spaces, service facilities and other unchecked public indoor spaces, the traders and service providers also have to monitor the observance of the obligation to wear a mask. This means that a trader is not allowed to let people who are not wearing a mask enter their sales or service space.

What to keep in mind when it comes to wearing masks?

  • A scarf, a tube scarf, a collar, a visor or other object that is clearly not meant to be used as a protective mask does not count as a mask. A preference is given to a medical mask or a mask equated to that (e.g. an FFP1-3 mask or a N95 respirator) which effectively stops the coronavirus from spreading.
  • Children under the age of 12 do not have to wear a mask.
  • People for whom wearing a mask is medically contraindicated have to present a certificate that has been issued by a health care service provider to prove it.
  • The order of the Government does not regulate the mask wearing obligation of employees: in employment relationships, the basis for the requirements of going to work and using personal protective equipment (including mask wearing) is the risk analysis of the working environment. If the analysis foresees mask wearing, a mask must be worn; if the risks of the spread of the virus have been lowered with other safety measures, those are the ones that need to be followed.

In order to stop the spread of the virus, the trader or service provider has to ensure dispersion of people in the public indoor spaces on their territory. The restriction does not apply to families moving together or if it is not reasonably possible to ensure dispersion.

Last updated: 20.12.2021 17:24

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People for whom wearing a mask is contraindicated for health reasons have to present a certificate that has been issued by a health care service provider to prove that fact.

Wearing a mask is generally the responsibility of each individual themselves but in commercial establishments, service and other unchecked public indoor spaces the observation of the obligation to wear a mask must also be monitored by the service providers and traders. This means that a trader is not allowed to permit people who are not wearing a mask to enter it's sales or service area. Children under the age of 12 do not have to wear a protective mask.

It should also be kept in mind that a scarf, a tube scarf, a collar, a visor or any other object that is clearly not meant to be worn as a protective mask do not count as a mask. This is necessary for achieving the objective of mask wearing more efficiently -- to stop the spread of the coronavirus and thus protect the life and health of the people.

The order of the Government does not regulate the mask wearing obligation of the employees of the store or the service provider: in employment relationships, the requirements to go to work and use personal protective equipment (including wearing a mask) are based on the pre-emptive measures enacted in the risk analysis of the working environment.

Last updated: 25.10.2021 11:55

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If it is not public space then the obligation to wear a mask does not extend to the back rooms of commercial establishments. The obligation to wear a mask does extend to service providers as well, if such an obligation is foreseen in their employer's risk analysis.

Last updated: 31.08.2021 22:40

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The basis for the requirement for the employees to wear a mask is the occupational health and safety regulation. In employment relationships the basis for going to work and using personal protective equipment (e.g. a mask) is the risk analysis of the working environment.

It is the task of the employer to evaluate the risks present in the working environment (including risks related to the spread of the virus), their effect on the health of the employee and, according to the results of the analysis, enact measures to lower the risks.

As a preventative measure, the employer might, for instance, foresee in the risk analysis that the employees have to get vaccinated if it is necessary to safely perform their professional duties. It is also possible to use other relevant measures, for instance to obligate the employees to wear personal protective equipment (including a mask, a protective shield), testing, reorganisation of work etc.

Last updated: 24.10.2021 21:07

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It is obligatory to behave in accordance with the risk analysis of the employer.

If the employer has, in the working environment risk analysis, come to the conclusion that the risks related to the spread of the virus have been lowered sufficiently with the use of other personal protective equipment, e.g. a visor or a protective glass, the employer does not have to wear a protective mask.

If the risk analysis has established that wearing a protective mask is necessary to safely perform the professional duties, the employee is obligated to wear a mask.

It is the task of the employer to assess the risks present in the working environment (including risks related to the spread of the virus), their effect on the health of the employee, and enact measures to lower the risks, in accordance with the results of the analysis. If it is necessary to carry out professional duties safely, the employer's risk analysis might also foresee the vaccination of employees, regular testing, reorganisation of work etc. in addition to using personal protective equipment as pre-emptive measures.

More information on lowering the risks during the COVID-19 pandemic can be found in the Tööelu (Work Life) portal (in Estonian).

Last updated: 23.10.2021 12:04

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Yes, it can. According to the Occupational Health and Safety Act, an employer has a legal obligation to do a working environment risk analysis, evaluate the risks stemming from a biological risk factor to its employees and plan corresponding measures to lower the risks. Based on the results of the analysis carried out in the working environment, the employer can determine in the risk analysis that in order to work in certain positions it is compulsory to get vaccinated, present a certificate proving recovery from COVID-19, do a COVID-19 test, or wear a mask. These measures can be implemented as alternatives to each other or simultaneously (e.g. vaccination/certificate and mask).

It is in the interests of all of us that the society remains as open as possible, and thus it is necessary to use all possible means to keep it that way in the future.

Last updated: 02.09.2021 19:23

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The duty to notify has not been imposed with a legal act. It has been taking place as cooperation between the state and the trader.

Last updated: 30.08.2021 19:46

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Yes, it is true that payments should be made

  • preferably contactlesly (payment limit has been temporarily raised to 50 Euros) or
  • with a bank card, as usual.

If possible, do not use cash.

If you have no other option than paying in cash, be vigilant about hand hygiene.

Last updated: 29.10.2021 16:28

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Just like in other public transport, it is also obligatory to wear in mask on internal ferries (except in activities where it is not possible, e.g. while eating in the restaurant). A mask is not obligatory for children under the age of 12. People who have a contraindication to wearing a mask for health reasons must present a corresponding certificate to the checker.

A scarf, a tube scarf, a collar, a visor or any other object that is not clearly meant to be worn as a protective mask do not count as a mask. A preference is given to a medical mask or a mask equated to that (e.g. an FFP1-3 mask or a N95 respirator) which effectively stops the Delta strain of the coronavirus from spreading.

Additionally, in the catering establishments of internal ferries it must be ensured that people are dispersed, disinfectants are available, and the disinfection rules are followed in accordance with the instructions of the Health Board. It is not obligatory to present COVID certificates on internal ferries and no clock limits are set on their activities.

Last updated: 14.11.2021 20:40

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Dispersion is not the 2+2 rule but guidance to keep a safe distance with each other in a public indoor space. A public indoor space is a room that can be entered by anyone (this also includes public transport).

People have to be and move around in a public indoor space in a dispersed manner. The restriction does not apply to families or in cases where it is not possible to ensure these conditions reasonably.

The person responsible for the activities (i.e. the trader, the service provider, the organiser of the event, the catering establishment etc.) ensures, there would not be an unreasonable amount of people in the space or room. The Government order does not prescribe an exact distance -- ensuring dispersion means that groups of persons (e.g. families) or individuals should not be too close to each other or in direct contact.

Close contacts between people who are not usually together increase the probability of the virus spreading.

Last updated: 25.10.2021 16:34

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Yes, it is.

The yellow immunisation passport is issued at the request of a person by a family doctor or some other medical worker carrying out vaccinations. If a person already has an immunisation passport and he wishes to prove his vaccination status with it later, he should bring it along to the vaccination. In that case, the person carrying out the vaccination can make a corresponding note in the passport. People who have been vaccinated abroad can also prove their vaccination status with the immunisation passport.

Among other things, the passport contains the disease against which the immunisation was administered, the date of immunisation, immune preparation that was used, the lot number of it, and the number of doses administered, also the name and other data of the immuniser.

Last updated: 07.08.2021 19:05

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The activities of all law enforcement bodies can be challenged or contested in court. In case of questions or a need to specify, both an entrepreneur and a private person always have the option of pre-emptively turning to the state helpline 1247 or writing to covid19@mkm.ee.

Last updated: 22.10.2021 21:51

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More information about the coronavirus and restrictions related to it is available calling 1247 (from abroad +372 600 1247).