More information about the coronavirus and restrictions related to it is available calling 1247 (from abroad +372 600 1247).

Restrictions in everyday life

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Current restrictions and guidelines have to be followed in order to avoid the spread of the virus and getting infected, and to protect the life and health of people. The Government of the Republic, in cooperation with the Scientific Advisory Board, assesses the infection risk in the country weekly, and enacts or eases the measures according to the risk level.

More information on the coronavirus and the decisions and changes to the order of life related to it can be obtained from the state helpline 1247. +372 600 1247 when calling from abroad.


It is recommended to wear a mask in public indoor spaces and in public transport.

Wearing a mask is recommended in public indoor spaces and public transport. A preference is given to a medical mask or a mask equated to that (e.g. an FFP1-3 mask or a N95 respirator) which effectively stops the coronavirus from spreading.

This mainly pertains to commercial and service establishments, museums, theatres, cinemas, but also public meetings, events etc. that gather together many people who do not come in daily contact with each other.


Keep a distance and disinfect your hands

Disinfect your hands regularly, and in crowded places try to keep a distance with people who you do not come in regular contact with.

Those who are sick remain in quarantine for ten days

People who have been diagnosed with COVID-19 have to stay in quarantine at home or permanent place of stay at least 10 days starting from the occurrence of symptoms (or from a positive test result if there are no symptoms). This also applies to the residents of shelters and safe houses who have to stay in quarantine on the spot. Isolation days can be calculated with the help of the calculator of the Estonian Family Medicine Association (in Estonian).


Close contacts are in self-isolation for seven days

Close contacts who live with a COVID-19 positive person or have come in contact with him have to remain in self-isolation for seven days, except if they have been vaccinated, recovered from the disease within the past six months or equated to a vaccinated person (i.e. recovered from the disease and been vaccinated). The exemption from quarantine for vaccinated close contacts is valid for: 9 months with the initial course of vaccinations (including minors whose vaccination certificates are valid without a term), 12 months with the booster dose.

If a close contact with a virus carrier took place in a kindergarten or child care, general education school or vocational school, the children and youths who have not been vaccinated against COVID-19 or recovered from COVID-19 may stay in simplified quarantine.

Staying in self-isolation is also recommended for people who are vaccinated or recovered from COVID-19 but are living with a person who has been infected. In that case a person should stay home for at least seven days and do distance work if possible. If it is not possible to work from home, a family doctor will issue a certificate for sick leave and the person will receive health insurance benefits.

Last updated: 11.04.2022 16:44

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The following rules apply to sports, training, youth work, hobby activities, informal education, and refresher training:

Dispersion

The organisers have to ensure dispersion indoors and at activities taking place in open air, availability of disinfectants and following of the disinfecting requirements in accordance with the instructions of the Health Board.

Protective mask

Wearing a protective mask is obligatory while engaging in informal education, hobby activities, refresher training etc in public indoor spaces, except in activities where it is not possible, (e.g. in doing direct sports, when coming in contact with water, in the sauna and by the poolside). A preference is given to a medical mask or a mask equated to that (e.g. an FFP1-3 mask or a N95 respirator) which effectively stops the delta strain of the coronavirus from spreading. A scarf, a tube scarf, a collar, a visor or any other object that is not clearly meant to be worn as a protective mask do not count as a mask. Wearing a mask is not obligatory for children under the age of 12. If a person cannot wear a mask for health reasons, he must present a medical certificate regarding the contraindication.

Requirements for the employees

It is obligatory to behave in accordance with the risk analysis of the employer. In employment relationships, the basis for going to work, the requirements regarding the use of personal protective equipment and other control measures of the spread of the virus (including the presenting of COVID certificates, testing, mask wearing etc.) is the working environment risk analysis conducted by the specific employer.

Last updated: 15.03.2022 21:08

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Yes, it is.

The yellow immunisation passport is issued at the request of a person by a family doctor or some other medical worker carrying out vaccinations. If a person already has an immunisation passport and he wishes to prove his vaccination status with it later, he should bring it along to the vaccination. In that case, the person carrying out the vaccination can make a corresponding note in the passport. People who have been vaccinated abroad can also prove their vaccination status with the immunisation passport.

Among other things, the passport contains the disease against which the immunisation was administered, the date of immunisation, immune preparation that was used, the lot number of it, and the number of doses administered, also the name and other data of the immuniser.

Last updated: 07.08.2021 19:05

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Dispersion is not the 2+2 rule but a guidance to keep a safe distance with each other at in a public indoor space or at an activity taking place outdoors. A public indoor space is a room that can be entered by anyone (this also includes public transport).

Close contacts between people who are not usually together increase the probability of the virus spreading.

Last updated: 07.06.2022 12:45

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The risk level of the coronavirus spread can be low, medium, high, or very high.

  • Low risk (green): the risk that the infection will spread and the burden on the health care system will rise is low and the society can operate as usual.
  • Medium risk (yellow): the operability of the health care system is not in critical danger but there is still a need to create further COVID beds, which will lengthen the waiting times of scheduled treatments. Some control measures have to be enacted in the society, which will help to slow down the national spread of the virus. For instance using the COVID certificate to ensure that there is no infection risk and wearing masks in public space if there is no COVID certificate.
  • High risk (orange): the operability of the health care system is in danger, the lines of regular medical services will significantly lengthen for people. In order to ensure the availability of medical aid, it is necessary to enact strict control measures in the society to avoid reaching the red level. For instance, this means that supervision over cultural, entertainment and catering establishments is increased and regional restrictions are enacted if necessary.
  • Very high (red): the operability of the medical system is not ensured. This means that the strictest control measures are enacted in the society, i.e. many institutions are closed, there is distance learning and working from home.

Indicators for risk levels, and ranges for them for each risk level have been established based on the recommendations of the Scientific Advisory Board and the Health Board. The seven day average number of people infected and hospitalised with COVID is taken into account. Additional indicators that are considered are the seven day average number of COVID-19 deaths, the full vaccine coverage of the adult population, the infection level people over the age of 60 and the number of COVID-19 patients on ventilators.

The risk level is reviewed once a week.

Read more about the risk levels from here: https://www.kriis.ee/et/riskitasemed (in Estonian).

Last updated: 09.09.2021 22:15

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At the green level, the risk that the infection spreads and the burden on the health care system increases is low and the society can function as usual.

Everyone can adjust their behaviour and actions according to the risk level of the spread of the virus.

What can everyone do on their own?

  • Get vaccinated and help people close to you to get vaccinated as well
  • Wash your hands

What can an organisation do?

  • Support your workers and visitors getting vaccinated
  • Ensure well-ventilated rooms
  • Put together a risk analysis and an action plan

What is done by the state?

  • Ensures that everyone has the opportunity to get vaccinated
  • Ensures the possibility of getting tested
  • Identifies possible outbreaks

Read more from the kriis.ee web page: instructions on how to act at different risk levels (in Estonian).

Last updated: 29.09.2021 15:50

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The yellow level means that the health care system is not in critical danger but new beds for COVID-19 do still need to be created, lengthening the waiting times of scheduled treatments. Some control measures need to be enacted in the society, allowing to slow the spread of the virus across the coutry. For instance, the use of the COVID certificate to ensure that there is no infection risk, and wearing masks in public spaces without the COVID certificate.

Everyone can adjust their behaviour and actions according to the risk level of the spread of the virus.

What can everyone do on their own?

  • Get vaccinated and help people close to you to get vaccinated as well
  • Wash your hands
  • Wear a facemask in crowded indoor spaces
  • Do a rapid test before meeting people who are in a risk group
  • Stay at home with even mild symptoms and do a rapid test
  • If the rapid test is positive, consult with a doctor

What can an organisation do?

  • Support your workers and visitors getting vaccinated
  • Ensure a well-ventilated space.
  • Put together a risk analysis and an action plan
  • Give recommendations on how to behave
  • Offer disinfectants and face masks
  • Offer testing opportunities
  • Offer vaccination opportunities

What does the state do?

  • Ensures that everyone has the opportunity to get vaccinated
  • Ensures the possibility of getting tested
  • Identifies possible outbreaks
  • Enacts measures to quickly reduce the number of infections

Read more about implementing the risk levels here: https://www.kriis.ee/et/riskitasemed (in Estonian).

Last updated: 29.09.2021 16:11

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If the orange level is reached, the operability of the health care system is in danger, the waiting times of regular medical services will lengthen considerably for people. In order to ensure that medical aid is available, strict control measures need to be enacted in the society, so that the red level would not be reached. This means, for instance, that supervision over the activities of cultural, entertainment, and catering establishments will be increased and regional restrictions will be enacted, if necessary.

Everyone can adjust their behaviour and actions according to the risk level of the spread of the virus.

What can everyone do on their own?

  • Get vaccinated and help people close to you to get vaccinated as well
  • Wash your hands
  • Wear a facemask in crowded indoor spaces
  • Do a rapid test before meeting people who are in a risk group
  • Stay at home with even mild symptoms and do a rapid test
  • If the rapid test is positive, consult with a doctor
  • If possible, work from home
  • Organise meetings virtually or in open air

What can an organisation do?

  • Support your workers and visitors getting vaccinated
  • Ensure a well-ventilated space.
  • Put together a risk analysis and an action plan
  • Give recommendations on how to behave
  • Offer disinfectants and face masks
  • Offer testing opportunities
  • Offer vaccination opportunities
  • Allow distance work
  • Reduce high risk contacts

What does the state do?

  • Ensures that everyone has the opportunity to get vaccinated
  • Ensures the possibility of getting tested
  • Identifies possible outbreaks
  • Enacts measures to quickly reduce the number of infections

Read more from the kriis.ee web page: instructions on how to act at different risk levels (in Estonian).

Last updated: 29.09.2021 16:22

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The red level means that the strictest control measures are established in the society, i.e. many institutions are closed, there is distance learning and working from home. The operability of the medical system is not ensured.

Everyone can adjust their behaviour and actions according to the risk level of the spread of the virus.

What can everyone do on their own?

  • Get vaccinated and help people close to you to get vaccinated as well
  • Wash your hands
  • Wear a facemask in crowded indoor spaces
  • Do a rapid test before meeting people who are in a risk group
  • Stay at home with even mild symptoms and do a rapid test
  • If the rapid test is positive, consult with a doctor
  • If possible work and study from home
  • Organise meetings virtually or in open air
  • Minimise the number of face-to-face meetings

What can an organisation do?

  • Support your workers and visitors getting vaccinated
  • Ensure a well-ventilated space.
  • Put together a risk analysis and an action plan
  • Give recommendations on how to behave
  • Offer disinfectants and face masks
  • Offer testing opportunities
  • Offer vaccination opportunities
  • Allow people who are not vaccinated to work and learn from a distance
  • Reduce high risk contacts
  • Allow and recommend that everyone goes to distance work and learning
  • Minimise the number of face-to-face meetings

What does the state do?

  • Ensures that everyone has the opportunity to get vaccinated
  • Ensures the possibility of getting tested
  • Identifies possible outbreaks
  • Enacts measures to quickly reduce the number of infections

Read more about implementing the risk levels here: https://www.kriis.ee/et/riskitasemed (in Estonian).

Last updated: 29.09.2021 16:04

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It is recommended to wear a mask in crowded indoor spaces and in public transport, especially for risk groups. It is also recommended to keep a reasonable distance, if possible, and to wash or disinfect hands regularly.

Last updated: 04.04.2022 23:00

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More information about the coronavirus and restrictions related to it is available calling 1247 (from abroad +372 600 1247).