More information about the coronavirus and restrictions related to it is available calling 1247 (from abroad +372 600 1247).

Restrictions in everyday life

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Restrictions in force in Estonia

Starting from August 26 it is compulsory to cover one's nose and mouth in public transport, including in trains and ferries. Children under the age of 12 do not have to wear a mask.


Starting from August 26 it is compulsory to wear a mask in unchecked public indoor spaces. This mainly pertains to commercial and service establishments but also state and local government agencies. A mask must be worn in stores, pharmacies, service offices of telecommunication enterprises and banks, libraries, but also the service bureaus of the Police and Border Guard Board, the Social Insurance Board, or the Health Board, and elsewhere. A mask must not be worn by children under the age of 12 or people for whom wearing a mask is not reasonable due to health concerns or for other substantial reasons.


Commercial enterprises and service providers

Starting from August 26 it is compulsory to wear a mask in stores and service facilities, disinfectants must be available and disinfection requirements must be fulfilled according to the instructions of the Health Board, and the requirement to disperse people must also be followed.


Catering establishments

Starting from August 26, all customers in catering establishments must present a COVID certificate proving vaccination, recovery or a prior negative test result. It is not necessary to present a sertificate for buying food as takeaway, but a mask must be worn. Consuming on the spot is allowed only if checking the COVID-19 certificates is ensured, and this applies even if the catering establishment is rented out, e.g. for birthdays, company parties or other private events. It is not necessary to present the certificate to buy food as takeaway or provide delivery services but in that case a mask must be worn.


Worship services

Starting from August 26 it is allowed to carry out public worship services and religious services in a way that indoors up to 50 people may participate in them (outdoors up to 100) in places of worship or a 50% maximum occupancy requirement has to be observed. A mask must be worn. If the participation numbers exceed these limits, the infection risk status of people must be checked.

The exception does not extend to church concerts which fall under the requirements set to organising events.


Museums, exhibition venues

Starting from August 26 all visitors must present a COVID certificate proving vaccination, recovery or a prior negative test result. The infection risk status of all participants must also be checked if the activity or event takes place at the location of service provision, e.g. if a gallery space or a museum hall is rented out for a private event.

At events and activities where the negative test result, recovery from COVID-19 or completed course of COVID-19 vaccination is checked, up to 6000 people can participate indoors and up to 12000 people outdoors.

The restrictions apply to public meetings and events, including conferences, cinema showings, provision of entertainment services, museums and exhibitions. Additionally, they apply to doing sports and training, youth work, hobby activities, informal education, refresher training, organising sports competitions and sports and exercise events, and also in public saunas, spas, pools, water parks and swimming facilities.


Entertainment sector and public events

Starting from August 26 all visitors must present a COVID certificate proving vaccination, recovery or a prior negative test result. The infection risk status of all visitors must be checked even when the activity or event takes place in a place of service provision, for example a catering establishment in rented out or a theatre performance is ordered from a theatre.

At events and activities where the negative test result, recovery from COVID-19 or completed course of COVID-19 vaccination is checked, up to 6000 people can participate indoors and up to 12000 people outdoors.

In order to participate at the event or the activity it is possible to do an antigen rapid test up to 48 hours earlier or a PCR test up to 72 hours earlier. The testing needs to be carried out by a health care service provider. In order to participate at the event or activity, the test results need to be negative.

Starting from August 9, the organiser of the event does not have to provide for the possibility to do an antigen rapid test immediately before the event anymore. The organiser is still allowed to provide for the possibility to do the rapid test, according to the instructions of the Health Board, but if it does not provide for this, the person wishing to enter with a test result has to organise their own testing at a health care service provider.

The restrictions apply to public meetings and events, including conferences, cinema showings, provision of entertainment services, museums and exhibitions. Additionally, they apply to doing sports and training, youth work, hobby activities, informal education, refresher training, organising sports competitions and sports and exercise events, and also in public saunas, spas, pools, water parks and swimming facilities.

Last updated: 06.09.2021 15:25

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The following needs to be considered:

Rapid tests that are valid for 48 hours:

  • antigen rapid tests that are used have been approved in the EU and meant for professional use
  • are done by a health care service provider, generally in their own medical centres, special testing locations (e.g. Confido's 17 locations across Estonia, Corrigo in Ida-Virumaa) or the user himself at a holder of an activity licence for general pharmacy services according to the instructions of the Health Board
  • the test results are entered into the health information system
  • a person gets a certificate to prove a negative result
  • a person pays for the service herself

Rapid tests that are valid only for the specific event, for providing a service on the spot

  • antigen rapid tests that are used have been approved in the EU
  • the tests are done by the visitor herself, on the spot, upon arriving to an event or to consume the service
  • doing the test is guided by a vaccinated person responsible for the activity; there is also a possibility to hire a health care service provider
  • an operator may charge for the service

If the test result is positive or unclear, the person must stay in isolation and contact their family doctor to confirm the diagnosis with a PCR test.

More information in the Health Board's instructions for administering rapid tests. (in Estonian).

Last updated: 27.08.2021 12:58

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Yes, it is.

The yellow immunisation passport is issued at the request of a person by a family doctor or some other medical worker carrying out vaccinations. If a person already has an immunisation passport and he wishes to prove his vaccination status with it later, he should bring it along to the vaccination. In that case, the person carrying out the vaccination can make a corresponding note in the passport. People who have been vaccinated abroad can also prove their vaccination status with the immunisation passport.

Among other things, the passport contains the disease against which the immunisation was administered, the date of immunisation, immune preparation that was used, the lot number of it, and the number of doses administered, also the name and other data of the immuniser.

Last updated: 07.08.2021 19:05

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The same rules apply to activities taking place both indoors and outdoors.

In sports, training, youth work, hobby activities and informal education, and refresher training; at sports competitions and sports and exercise events; in saunas, spas, water parks and swimming pools; at public meetings and events (including in the theatre, at the cinema, at a concert, incl. a church concert, at a conference); in museums and exhibition facilities; at entertainment services all participants, regardless of the number of people, who are older than 18 years of age must present a COVID certificate proving vaccination, recovery or a negative result of a prior test. Infection risk status must also be proven if the activity or event takes place at a location where services are provided, i.e. when a catering establishment is rented out or a theatre performance is performed on order at a theatre.

COVID certificates do not need to be checked at unrestricted outdoor events (for instance, events that take place in one neighbourhood of a town, where people are in constant movement and it is not possible to determine an activity with a certain location and number of participants).

The organisers have an obligation to check the validity of the COVID certificates. If there is a substantiated doubt, the person must be asked to present an identity document.

Indoors, in addition to checking the COVID certificates and tests, it is important to ensure that people are dispersed and disinfection requirements are followed, and other measures aiming to stop the spread of the coronavirus are followed according to the instructions of the Health Board (in Estonian).

If the person responsible for the activities is checking the infection risk status of persons, up tp 6000 persons may participate in the events and activities indoors and 12000 persons outdoors, provided that the abovementioned order is followed.


Last updated: 26.08.2021 12:35

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Dispersion is not the 2+2 rule but guidance to keep a safe distance with each other. Ensuring dispersion means that it must be ensured that groups of persons or individuals are not too close to each other and in direct contact.

Last updated: 30.08.2021 19:49

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The risk level of the coronavirus spread can be low, medium, high, or very high.

  • Low risk (green): the risk that the infection will spread and the burden on the health care system will rise is low and the society can operate as usual.
  • Medium risk (yellow): the operability of the health care system is not in critical danger but there is still a need to create further COVID beds, which will lengthen the waiting times of scheduled treatments. Some control measures have to be enacted in the society, which will help to slow down the national spread of the virus. For instance using the COVID certificate to ensure that there is no infection risk and wearing masks in public space if there is no COVID certificate.
  • High risk (orange): the operability of the health care system is in danger, the lines of regular medical services will significantly lengthen for people. In order to ensure the availability of medical aid, it is necessary to enact strict control measures in the society to avoid reaching the red level. For instance, this means that supervision over cultural, entertainment and catering establishments is increased and regional restrictions are enacted if necessary.
  • Very high (red): the operability of the medical system is not ensured. This means that the strictest control measures are enacted in the society, i.e. many institutions are closed, there is distance learning and working from home.

Indicators for risk levels, and ranges for them for each risk level have been established based on the recommendations of the Scientific Advisory Board and the Health Board. The seven day average number of people infected and hospitalised with COVID is taken into account. Additional indicators that are considered are the seven day average number of COVID-19 deaths, the full vaccine coverage of the adult population, the infection level people over the age of 60 and the number of COVID-19 patients on ventilators.

The risk level is reviewed once a week.

Read more about the risk levels from here: https://www.kriis.ee/et/riskitasemed (in Estonian).

Last updated: 09.09.2021 22:15

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Low risk means that the coronavirus is spreading in the community with solitary cases, the origin on which is known, but the risk of wider spread remains. Our objective is to avoid the spread of the virus, and retain vigilance so that there would not be any need to enact restrictions.

What can everyone do on their own?

  • Eat healthy, be active, and get enough rest.
  • Wash your hands
  • Get vaccinated at first chance.
  • Stay at home with even mild symptoms, consult with a doctor, and if there is reason to suspect COVID-19, do a test.
  • Download the HOIA app to your phone.

What can an organisation do?

  • Create the possibilities for preventive health behaviour.
  • Ensure a well-ventilated space.
  • Create the possibilities for studying, working, consuming from a distance.

What does the state do?

  • Organises a fast and wide vaccination.
  • Ensures testing capabilities.
  • Identifies possible outbreaks and enacts isolation requirements for close contacts.
  • Supports preventive health behaviour with clear instructions.
  • In cooperation with the people, finds the best solutions for stopping the spread of the virus.

Read more about implementing the risk levels here: https://www.kriis.ee/et/riskitasemed (in Estonian).

Last updated: 27.04.2021 12:57

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Medium risk means that there are outbreaks of infection in the community and the total number of infections is on the rise. The objective is to avoid the infection of risk groups and the necessity to enact restrictions.

What can everyone do on their own?

  • Eat healthy, be active, and get enough rest.
  • Wash your hands
  • Get vaccinated at first chance.
  • Stay at home with even mild symptoms, consult with a doctor, and if there is reason to suspect COVID-19, do a test.
  • Download the HOIA app to your phone.
  • Wear a facemask in public places.
  • Avoid crowded and closed spaces.
  • If possible, meet your acquaintances outdoors and reduce the number of people you are meeting.

What can an organisation do?

  • Create the possibilities for preventive health behaviour.
  • Ensure a well-ventilated space.
  • Create the possibilities for studying, working, consuming from a distance.
  • Communicate the risk and give instructions for how to behave.
  • Reduce the number of non-essential contacts.

What does the state do?

  • Organises a fast and wide vaccination.
  • Ensures testing capabilities.
  • Identifies possible outbreaks and enacts isolation requirements for close contacts.
  • Supports preventive health behaviour with clear instructions.
  • In cooperation with the people, finds the best solutions for stopping the spread of the virus.
  • Implements precautionary measures to reduce the risk of infection without substantially limiting opportunities (e.g. partial occupancy and temporal limitations indoors, regional differentiation, if possible).
  • Implements measures to protect the risk groups (e.g. in care homes).

Read more about implementing the risk levels here: https://www.kriis.ee/et/riskitasemed (in Estonian).

Last updated: 27.04.2021 12:57

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High risk means that there is community spread of the infection outside the outbreaks, and the total number of infections is rising quickly. The objective is to ensure regular medical aid, and avoid the necessity to enact wide-reaching restrictions.

What can everyone do on their own?

  • Eat healthy, be active, and get enough rest.
  • Wash your hands
  • Get vaccinated at first chance.
  • Stay at home with even mild symptoms, consult with a doctor, and if there is reason to suspect COVID-19, do a test.
  • Download the HOIA app to your phone.
  • Wear a facemask in public places.
  • Avoid crowded and closed spaces.
  • If possible, meet your acquaintances outdoors and reduce the number of people you are meeting.
  • Work or study from home, or wear a facemask at work or in school.
  • Interact with people outdoors, on the phone or online.
  • Help members of risk groups avoid contacts and offer them contact-free assistance.

What can an organisation do?

  • Create the possibilities for preventive health behaviour.
  • Ensure a well-ventilated space.
  • Create the possibilities for studying, working, consuming from a distance.
  • Communicate the risk and give instructions for how to behave.
  • Reduce the number of non-essential contacts.
  • Expand the opportunities to do distance work or distance learning as much as possible.
  • Offer up solutions that take place outdoors or reduce contacts in other ways.

What does the state do?

  • Organises a fast and wide vaccination.
  • Ensures testing capabilities.
  • Identifies possible outbreaks and enacts isolation requirements for close contacts.
  • Supports preventive health behaviour with clear instructions.
  • In cooperation with the people, finds the best solutions for stopping the spread of the virus.
  • Implements precautionary measures to reduce the risk of infection without substantially limiting opportunities (e.g. partial occupancy and temporal limitations indoors, regional differentiation, if possible).
  • Implements measures to protect the risk groups (e.g. in care homes).
  • Implements measures that reduce long term contacts in activities that have a high risk of infection (e.g. further occupancy and temporal limits indoors and outside, limiting active group activities, regional restrictions).

Read more about implementing the risk levels here: https://www.kriis.ee/et/riskitasemed (in Estonian).

Last updated: 27.04.2021 12:57

Did this response answer your question?

Very high risk means that the community spread of the infection is very high, and the total number of infections is rising very fast. The objective is to ensure emergency medical aid and to help the restrictions take effect so that it would be possible to reopen the society.

What can everyone do on their own?

  • Eat healthy, be active, and get enough rest.
  • Wash your hands
  • Get vaccinated at first chance.
  • Stay at home with even mild symptoms, consult with a doctor, and if there is reason to suspect COVID-19, do a test.
  • Download the HOIA app to your phone.
  • Wear a facemask in public places.
  • Avoid crowded and closed spaces.
  • If possible, meet your acquaintances outdoors and reduce the number of people you are meeting.
  • Work or study from home, or wear a facemask at work or in school.
  • Interact with people outdoors, on the phone or online.
  • Help members of risk groups avoid contacts and offer them contact-free assistance.
  • Avoid all contacts outside your home.
  • If possible, volunteer to help other and those who take care of others.

What can an organisation do?

  • Create the possibilities for preventive health behaviour.
  • Ensure a well-ventilated space.
  • Create the possibilities for studying, working, consuming from a distance.
  • Communicate the risk and give instructions for how to behave.
  • Reduce the number of non-essential contacts.
  • Expand the opportunities to do distance work or distance learning as much as possible.
  • Offer up solutions that take place outdoors or reduce contacts in other ways.
  • Ensure that the only people who are at the workplace are those whose presence is essential for the continuation of the organisation's functioning.
  • Help your people to deal with the restrictions.

What does the state do?

  • Organises a fast and wide vaccination.
  • Ensures testing capabilities.
  • Identifies possible outbreaks and enacts isolation requirements for close contacts.
  • Supports preventive health behaviour with clear instructions.
  • In cooperation with the people, finds the best solutions for stopping the spread of the virus.
  • Implements precautionary measures to reduce the risk of infection without substantially limiting opportunities (e.g. partial occupancy and temporal limitations indoors, regional differentiation, if possible).
  • Implements measures to protect the risk groups (e.g. in care homes).
  • Implements measures that reduce long term contacts in activities that have a high risk of infection (e.g. further occupancy and temporal limits indoors and outside, limiting active group activities, regional restrictions).
  • Limits all avoidable indoor activities so that the virus would not spread from one household to another.
  • If necessary, enacts further occupancy and temporal restrictions to activities taking place outdoors.

Read more about implementing the risk levels here: https://www.kriis.ee/et/riskitasemed (in Estonian).

Last updated: 27.04.2021 12:57

Did this response answer your question?

More information about the coronavirus and restrictions related to it is available calling 1247 (from abroad +372 600 1247).