More information about the coronavirus and restrictions related to it is available calling 1247 (from abroad +372 600 1247).

Restrictions in everyday life, including shopping centres, public transport, entertainment, family events

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Starting from February 22, the following restrictions apply all over Estonia:

There continues to be an obligation to wear a mask, or to cover the nose and mouth in public indoor spaces, including public transport

The obligation to wear a mask or to cover the nose and mouth applies in public indoor spaces, including public transport and service areas (except for children under the age of 12, or where wearing a mask are not possible due to health considerations, special needs, the nature of the work or activity, or other important reasons). A public indoor space is a space intended for public use that can be entered by anyone, without, for example, a requirement to pre-register; it is a place where there are a lot of people who do not come into contact with each other on a daily basis.


The 2+2 rule still applies to all public indoor spaces

The so-called 2+2 rule must be followed everywhere in public indoor spaces, which means that up to two people can move together, keeping a distance of two meters from other people. This rule applies, for example, in a bank office, museum, exhibitions, hairdressing and beauty salons, in the lobby of an accommodation establishment, but also in water parks, swimming pools, saunas. The restriction does not apply to a family moving around together or if it cannot be reasonably ensured, for example if there are many passengers in public transport, where, in addition to keeping the maximum possible distance, a mask must be worn.


The requirement of a 50% occupancy limit in the indoor sales premises of a store, in the service premises of a service provider and in the public space of a retail establishment still applies

A 50% maximum occupancy must be ensured in all indoor stores, service providers' service premises and public premises of a retail establishment, and the 2+2 rule must be observed while ensuring that the occupancy of the premises does not exceed 50 percent. Therefore, 50 percent of the floor space available for public use must first be calculated, and since customers must also follow the 2+2 rule, this 50% must be divided by 4 to give each customer 4m2.


After the school break, no educational activities will take place on the premises of school buildings for students starting from grade 5 for one week (until March 7), in order to break the infection chains. This means that from March 1 to March 7 it is not allowed to be or move around in the general education school buildings.

The restriction does not apply to students in grades 1 to 4, or if the students require educational support services or the teacher considers that they need consultations in order to achieve learning results, if they are doing practical studies, exams or tests, or are participating in Olympiads.


Starting from February 22, the occupancy of catering establishments may not exceed 50 percent. The 6+2 rule is still in force in catering establishments and places where entertainment services are provided. Catering and entertainment establishments must be closed for on-site visitors between the hours of 21.00 and 06.00.

There may be up to 6 people together per table or group, keeping a distance of two metres from others. These restrictions do not extend to families out together and in cases where this condition cannot be reasonably ensured. The service provider ensures that between the hours of 21:00 and 06:00 the only persons present in the sales or service premises of a catering establishment are there to purchase food for takeaway or to provide delivery and transport services, the owner of the place of service or their representative, employees, person involved in the execution of emergency services and persons required for the economic operations of the establishment.


The provider of entertainment services must ensure that the number of customers does not exceed 200 persons indoors and 250 outdoors.

Outdoors, people must be spread out, i.e. a 2-meter distance between people must be ensured. The 6+2 rule will remain in force indoors.

An indoor venue for providing entertainment services is, for instance, a night club, a bowling hall, a children's playroom etc. Outdoor entertainment services are different organised activities, e.g. bog hikes, barrel saunas.

At public events in indoor venues with permanent seating (including conferences, theatre performances, concerts and cinema showings) the maximum allowed number of participants is still 400. Outside the seating area (e.g. in wardrobes, lobbies etc.), up to two people can move around together, keeping a distance of at least 2 meters with others. These restrictions to not extend to families moving around or staying together, or if this condition cannot be reasonably met.


The maximum allowed number of participants in public meetings and other public events, including worship and other religious services was also changed: going forward, up to 200 people may participate in indoor public meetings/public events and up to 250 in outdoor events.

Similarly to what applies to entertainment services, the spreading out of participants must also be ensured at outdoor public meetings/events. This does not apply to those public events and sports competitions and events that have received a special permit from the government e.g. Tartu Maraton.


It is generally not allowed to be in saunas, spas, pools, water parks and swimming facilities meant for public use during the period between February 22 and March 7, except for sports and training in certain conditions.

It is only allowed to be in these places in order to use accommodation services, or for doing sports/training, provided that it is ensured that the people are spread out, the occupancy does not exceed 50% and disinfectants are available. For individual swimming as a sporting activity, it is allowed to use those indoor swimming pools that have been registered in the Estonian sports registry and have an assigned number of competition lanes. It is also allowed to use the kiddie pools for individual activities, e.g. a child with a parent or a coach.

The restriction does not apply to professional sports activities taking place within a competition system of a sports federation, including to the members and candidates of Estonian national adult and youth teams and players of the teams in the highest national divisions, nor to the activities of disabled persons. The restriction also does not apply to the given venue's owner or employees, people connected to providing emergency services and people necessary for operating the venue, and to activities related to military defence and internal security of the state.

Public saunas may be used by those people for whom the possibility to wash themselves is unavoidably necessary to ensure personal hygiene. This applies to persons who do not have other access to washing facilities.


Indoor informal education and hobby activities, refresher training, sports and youth work must take base on an individual basis during the period of February 22 to March 7. Indoor group activities, including group workouts, are not allowed.

Outdoor sports and training, and carrying out youth work, hobby activities and informal education, and refresher training are allowed, provided that there are no more than 50 persons in a group and the total number of people does not exceed 250. It must be ensured that the 50-member groups do not come into contact with other groups.

Indoors, only individual activities or training is allowed starting from February 22. This includes training with an instructor or a (sparring)partner, and at least a 2-meter distance must be kept with other people. This means that it is also allowed to hold training sessions with a personal trainer but also between two individual athletes (without a coach). e.g. racket disciplines (tennis, badminton, table tennis etc.).

Training can also be conducted between one trainer and one trainee, or from a distance, e.g. via a video link.

The restriction does not apply to those students in grades 1 to 4 who are allowed to be in a school building and are studying in the same class. These restrictions also do not extend to kindergarten groups that come into daily contact with each other, professional sporting activities, including to members and candidates of Estonian national adult and youth teams and players in the teams of the highest national divisions, and to activities related to military defence and internal security of the state. The restrictions are also not applied to the activities of persons with disabilities, including the provision of social and occupational rehabilitation services.

Up to 250 people may participate in outdoor sports competitions and it must be ensured that they are spread out. This does not apply to events that have received a permit from the government, e.g. organising the Tartu Maraton.

Indoor sports competitions, and sports and exercise events can be attended only by the teams of the highest national divisions, professional athletes and the members and candidates of Estonian national adult and youth teams participating in the competition system of a sports federation. It is not allowed to organise other indoor sports competitions and exercise events, e.g. friendly matches or hobby sport competitions. This restriction does not apply to the students in grades 1 to 4 who may be present in school buildings.

Spectators are not allowed at competitions. The organiser of the event must also ensure that the participants are not present at the venue of the event between the hours of 22.00 and 06.00.


Self-isolation

A 10-day self-isolation requirement applies to close contacts. There is an option to go and do a test on the 10th day if you wish. Information on that will come either from a robocall, or an SMS or an e-mail sent by the Health Board.

The 10-day self-isolation requirement continues to apply when arriving to Estonia from at-risk countries. In order to reduce the isolation period, a test must be done no longer than 72 hours before arrival to the country or immediately after arriving in Estonia, and a repeat test must be done on the sixth day. The 6 day period will be counted from the day the first test was done. If the results of both the abovementioned tests were negative, the person can end the self-isolation before the tenth day. Information on arrivals from which countries are subject to movement restrictions and whose citizens and residents have to go through testing is published on the web page of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Starting from February 2, there is a derogation from having to self-isolate as a close contact for people who have been vaccinated against or had the coronavirus within the last six months. A person who has had the coronavirus or is vaccinated against it must still wear a mask indoors during the next 10 days or cover their nose and mouth if they have been a close contact. The obligation to wear a mask does not extend to children under the age of 12 or if wearing a mask is not possible due to health considerations, the nature of the work or activities, or for some other substantial reason. Additionally, an asymptomatic close contact who has had the coronavirus or is vaccinated against it must monitor their health closely during the next 10 days and follow the measures enacted by the government and the Health Board to stop the spread of the virus. Following the measures is necessary as there is still very little scientific information on how probable it is that people who have had the coronavirus or are vaccinated against it can still get infected or spread COVID-19. As an exception, a person crossing the border into Estonia who has had the coronavirus within the past six months and has been declared recovered by a doctor, or who has been vaccinated against the coronavirus within the past six months is not subject to the requirement to stay in a place of residence or a permanent place of stay, or the testing requirements. This person must still adhere to the restrictions in force in Estonia and follow all measures that have been enacted to stop the spread of the virus.

Last updated: 22.02.2021 11:24

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More information about the coronavirus and restrictions related to it is available calling 1247 (from abroad +372 600 1247).